The real cost of bad communications

30 Jan

The last blog post I wrote focused on the radical change programme that we are working on in Monmouthshire County Council and I promised to feedback on our progress. So here goes.

I’ve been a student in our Intrapreneurship School* for a few weeks now, and today (working with fellow students) it felt like there was a light bulb moment. It wasn’t because our discovery was particularly new or revolutionary, it was because the way we’ve illustrated it gets right to the heart of the matter. And, it’s pretty hard to argue with.

Like many organisations, we sometimes experience inconsistencies internally. Some people know stuff, some don’t. Information is sometimes communicated well and sometimes it isn’t. This leads to inconsistencies. As an employee, if you’re well informed and you know where to find the information you need then the likelihood is that you’ll provide a better service. If you’re uninformed or ‘out of the loop’ the chances are this will impact on the day job. And it’s this ‘day job’ that’s the important bit.

The ‘day job’ is where you meet the customer, where you provide a service, where you do something that matters. In local government, this is what it’s all about so if there’s something that’s stopping you from doing the best job you can do, sort it.

For us, whilst we’re working hard on improving it, we know that in some areas the flow of information isn’t as good as it should be. When we drill down to what that really means we get to customer experiences. If information isn’t being shared internally that means staff aren’t clued-up. If staff aren’t clued-up how can they answer customers questions? And, we all know how frustrating it is when no-one can answer your question.

So, as my colleagues and I discussed this we thought it might be clearer to illustrate our observations:

cost of communication matrix

For those of you who know your PR theory, this model may look familiar. It’s very much like the power/interest matrix and it works in a similar way.

The quicker you can get good information out to your customer, the more satisfied they will be. You have resolved their issue quickly so, in theory, is less resource intensive.

If it takes you a long time to respond to a customer and you get bad/inaccurate information out to them, they will be really dissatisfied. And if they’re dissatisfied, it’s more likely that they will need to come back to you to resolve the issue or complain. That means more resources are needed.

So, if we put it like that it’s hard to argue with. Let’s get information flowing to those who need it, empower them with knowledge and see what that does for an organisation’s reputation. 🙂

 

*Intrapreneurship School is an internal training scheme that encourages innovation, understanding and shifts our perspective to focus on what really matters. We learn about system redesign and other models to find better ways of delivering/enabling services.

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2 Responses to “The real cost of bad communications”

  1. craigarmiger January 31, 2013 at 8:41 pm #

    I think you’re ‘right on the money’ (pun intended) Jess and the poster should reproduced as banners for laptops or desks or walls – anywhere where it gets seen everyday. I recently saw a motivational poster selling for £50 why when we can generate our own with MCC talent?

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